CIP: The Kuleshov Effect

In preparation for our Pastiche 1560 brief we were to research the Kuleshov Effect in order to have an understanding of visual methods we could use ourselves.

The Kuleshov effect is a film editing-montage effect demonstrated by Soviet filmmaker Lev Kuleshov in the 1910s and 1920s. It is a mental phenomenon by which viewers derive more meaning from the interaction of two sequential shots than from a single shot in isolation.

Kuleshov edited a short film in which a shot of the expressionless face of Ivan Mosjoukine was alternated with various other shots (a plate of soup, a girl in a coffin, a woman on a divan). The film was shown to an audience who believed that the expression on Mosjoukine’s face was different each time he appeared, depending on whether he was “looking at” the plate of soup, the girl in the coffin, or the woman on the divan, showing an expression of hunger, grief or desire, respectively. The footage of Mosjoukine was actually the same shot each time.

Kuleshov used the experiment to indicate the usefulness and effectiveness of film editing. The implication is that viewers brought their own emotional reactions to this sequence of images, and then moreover attributed those reactions to the actor, investing his impassive face with their own feelings.

Here is my own example of the theory, suggesting hunger, sadness and lust.

picmonkey-collage
The Kuleshov Effect example by Hannah Phillips

 

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